Recipes

Here’s the beginning of a collection of recipes sent to us from our friends on Facebook, farm stand customers, family, and friends.

  • Brossmans’ Farm Fresh Tomato Soup

    Roasting the tomatoes brings out the flavor – it’s worth the time and effort!
    Preheat over to 375 F. If you have convection roast, even better.
    Core and quarter (smaller if tomato is quite large) enough tomatoes to cover a cookie sheet – I use a mixture of reds, Purple Cherokee and Green Zebra Stripe. Now add sliced onion (I love the Candy Tufts from the stand), peppers (any mixture you like – I use Key Largos and Sweet Italian), five or six cloves garlic. How many? Depends on how much flavor you want to add. I use one large or two smaller onions, four or five peppers.

    Drizzle with olive oil and add some salt and fresh ground pepper. Now toss everything around till all the pieces have an oil coating, and arrange the tomatoes cut side down on the cookie sheet.

    Roast at 375 F for about 20 minutes. Turn the oven off just when the tops of the tomatoes and onions are threatening to turn black.

    Let cool, then put into soup pot and simmer about half an hour till everything is soft and happy to go through the food mill. Let cool again, and put through a food mill to remove seeds and skins.

    Put the purified liquid back in the soup pot, add 1 quart chicken broth (low sodium is a good idea), some chopped basil, thyme or whatever herbs you like. Simmer, lid on, for up to an hour.

    Now let your creative cooking genie take over – I like to add fresh corn kernels. It could be a base for chicken or beef vegetable soup or just heat up a crouton and have some tomato soup.

    It freezes well. We lunched on tomato soup through the winter.

    – Shannon Sollinger
    Virginia Correspondent/Lancaster Farming
    Hamilton, VA

  • Tomato Sauce

    From Shannon Sollinger: to use any time you need tomato sauce — spaghetti, lasagna, sloppy joes, liven up a soup…

    Core about 10 lb tomatoes (recipe said plum, I used a mixture of heirloom and Early Girl) — chop coarsely into large bowl, add 1T sugar, some salt. Let it sit and get nice and juicy.

    Brown 6 garlic cloves, halved, in 1 C extra virgin olive oil in large soup pot. When they are crispy and everything smells garlicky, remove the cloves. Add tomatoes, 6-10 coarsley chopped sweet banana peppers, several sweet Italian peppers, 1 C loosely pack basil leaves. Bring to a simmer, simmer for 2-3 hours.

    Let cool. Put whole mixture through a food mill and discard solids. Freeze for happy cooking next winter.

  • Zucchini Fritters

    Shannon Sollinger posted this on our Facebook page:
    zucchini frittersTried many zucchini fritter recipes, this was by far the best.
    Grate one large (1.5 lb) zucchini, put it in a colander, salt it, and let sit half hour or so. Press with towel to get moisture out. Mix together in a medium/large bowl 1/4 cup flour and 1 T cornstarch. Add one beaten egg, the zucchini, 3 T chopped fresh chives, a grind or two of black pepper. Stir up really well. I think I threw in some red pepper flakes.
    Heat 1/3 c. olive oil (not EV) in frying pan, spoon fritter mixture in, brown lightly on both sides. Recipe had a dipping sauce of 3 T unseasoned rice vinegar, 1 T reduced sodium soy sauce, 1.5 t sugar, red pepper flakes.

  • Watermelon Radish Recipe
    watermelonradishWatermelon Radishes — Jerry Sollinger posted this recipe on our Facebook page.

    Slice one large radish very thin (but not slicing off end of thumb, as I did), and one small onion, also sliced thin. Combine 1/3 cup orange juice, 2T EV olive oil, 2 T apple cider vinegar, splash of rice wine vinegar, 1/2 tsp each sea salt and pepper. Mix it up, pour over radish/onion, cover and refrigerate over night.